Lachit Barphukan & Religion – A rebuttal to Commie deception.

Its a shame I have to write this, because frankly his religion should be least of our concerns. He fought against an army which represented Uzbek invaders and that is all that should concern us. But instead of recognising the flaw that was the Mughal empire, our secular donkeys issue following statements with regards to Barphukan – Mughal struggle :

  1. Lachit Barphukan was not a Hindu.
  2. He fought against the Hindu Ram Singh.
  3. Most important commander was a Muslim named Ismail Siddiqui.
  4. It was not a Hindu – Muslim struggle. Let us not paint it that way.
  5. Assam was never a part of India. (since definition of India is only as per Oxford dictionary)

So now, let us take the claims one by one.

Yes . He was not a Hindu. Surprised ? 

Technically speaking, he belonged to a religion called Fralung. This religion traces its origins to a God named Lengdon. Lengdon’s two children Khunlai and Khunlung came down to earth and started the Tai Ahom dynasty etc etc. Mythology basically, lets say Fralung mythology. Then all this manifests itself as deities like Ngi Ngau Kham etc. There was even a temple to this God at Charaideo in Assam.

But, there are some aspects of this ‘religion’ which are very close to classical Hinduism. Like for example – ancestor worship. Also there was a definite element of idol worship. Infact, an image of Lengdon was given to the king to signify his royal bearing. Then there was the Lakli calender, which closely resembled the Brihaspati Chakra. Also, there is a claim that Lengdon is Indra – but this is contested and since this is not a lecture on theology, I will not go into it. But why is he associated with Indra of all Gods ? A question to ponder.

Most importantly, adopting certain Hindu customs did not make them apostates. Even today, there are members of the Tai Ahom tribe, who while following many ‘Hindu’ customs, still follow Fralung customs like burial.

Even more important, is that after migrating from Burma, this dynasty adopted and enriched the local culture. They welcomed someone  Shankaradeva, built temples, tanks etc and ensured the well being of the people. So maybe initially they were not Hindu, but certainly did more for Hinduism in the north east than some “Hindus” elsewhere in the country. Also, they adopted more and more customs of classical Hinduism as time passed, till we had kings like Rudra Singha who was as Hindu as you or me.

Another interesting question for the commies to answer — why did this dynasty, at the peak of their power, exposed to so many different ideologies, adopt more customs of Hinduism ? Why not Islam – politically dominant every where else in India ?

For want of a better word – “Indic religion” is a good term to use for Lachit Barphukan specifically. The umbrella under which you will find Buddhism, Jainism perhaps even Sikhism among others. They are intrinsically different from Abrahamic religions and share many things in common. Moreover, in nations like China and Japan, people have been known top officially follow two religions at same time. Within India , is it odd to find Buddha statues in Hindu homes or Jains paying respects at Hindu temples ?

Commies  can think of a religion only in terms of my way or the high way — which is the crux of the problem.

2. He fought against the Hindu Ram Singh. 

Well, this I have mentioned firmly in my book. What’s more, he even prayed at the Hayagriv temple at Hajo. His father also prayed at some temple in the Deccan – when he invaded on behalf of Aurangzeb. But again the secular donkeys forget that while the sword was in Hindu hands, the thought was Mughal. And what did Aurangzeb do in all those territories captured for him by his Hindu mansabdars ? Jaziya is just one example. So, the correct assessment is, he fought against the Mughal empire of Aurangzeb. Again, a common trick of deception perfected by commies – missing the woods for the trees. The whole exercise is of course to absolve the Mughal empire of any wrong.

3. His most important commander was Ismail Siddiqui 

Well, I agree he was an important commander and was instrumental in capturing Guwahati in November 1667. For this he should be known to all and my deepest respects to him. But, he was not the only commander under Lachit Barphukan. As often happens in such cases, his importance has been over blown by many commies. My question is, why does the Muslim fighting for the Hindu (or the Fralung here) always get mentioned like it is something extra special ? Were not the other people who accompanied Siddiqui important ? How many have heard about Miri Sandikoi, who prevented his entire battalion from retreating at Saraighat ? Doesn’t this itself show that such had been the exception and not the norm ?

Coming to his rank , it was Hazarika. Meaning he led contingents of 1000 soldiers. There were ranks for three thousand and six thousand also. So frankly, there were higher ranked officers who also played a very important role in the Assamese victory.

Well, in this we can see another commie gem — He was patriotic and remained true to his king inspite of being Muslim.

And if you have not seen the problem in that statement, well god help you.

4. It was not a Hindu Muslim struggle. 

Well it was not. It was a struggle between people who wanted swarajya and Uzbek invaders. It had as much logic in it as the Indian Freedom Struggle. Maharashtra, Assam, perhaps Bundelkhand have the distinction in having participated and won in not one but two freedom struggles.

Now, will our commies and marxists  agree to this point ?

5. Assam was never a part of India. 

This again comes straight from Marx Tuition Classes. Commies have been trying to fit the Indian “nation” into European definitions and failed. In fact, a nation created on those very communal lines is on verge of falling apart.Pakistan that is. The commie assertion is — no “Indian” power has ruled, and hence it is never part of India. Basically till the British came, Delhi never ruled. Then this leads to usual commie dialogues

India has always been defined in cultural terms. And Assam very well fits in. Narakasur has been mentioned in the Mahabharat, as has been Bhagadatta. Then we have Ulupi and Chitrangada further east. Most important is the Kamakhya mandir at Guwahati. It is a very important Shakti peeth – symbolizing the Yoni. The other important Shakti peeth is in Balochistan ! And likewise there are over fifty spread all over the subcontinent.

This itself should tell us that Assam is culturally integral to India, much like the 12 jyotirlings. Also, the name of Burma was Brahmadesh, and Brahma idols are prevalent in that religion. Kamrup comes from Kamdev. The Yogini Tantra was also composed in Assam. And last but not the least the old name of Guwahati – “Pragjyotishpur” should finish all doubts about its cultural unity with India since ancient times.

well so .. there you go.

storieswithasoul

Hi friends, the following is an interview of author Aneesh Gokhale, on his second novel ‘Brahmaputra – The story of Lachit Barphukan’ . The novel is generating great reviews and is an excellent follow up to his first novel ‘Sahyadris to Hindukush’.

agAbout the Author :

Aneesh Gokhale, born March 1988, completed his schooling in Pune and is currently working in merchant navy as a navigating officer. He is an avid trekker, hiker and is passionate about  Indian history. He loves reading and writing.

Sahyadris to Hindukush was his first book ( 2012)

Brahmaputra is his second book (2015)

He has also given public talks on numerous occasions , on Maratha and Assamese history in both English and Marathi. His essays and interviews have been published in various newspapers and magazines. In 2015 he was also invited as Chief Guest for Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan (Pune) Independence Day celebration.

He can…

View original post 1,546 more words

Lachit Barphukan & Religion – A reply for Commies

Its a shame I have to write this, because frankly his religion should be least of our concerns. He fought against an army which represented Uzbek invaders and that is all that should concern us. But instead of recognising the flaw that was the Mughal empire, our secular donkeys issue following statements with regards to Barphukan – Mughal struggle :

  1. Lachit Barphukan was not a Hindu.
  2. He fought against the Hindu Ram Singh.
  3. Most important commander was a Muslim named Ismail Siddiqui.
  4. It was not a Hindu – Muslim struggle. Let us not paint it that way.
  5. Assam was never a part of India. (since definition of India is only as per Oxford dictionary)

So now, let us take the claims one by one.

Yes . He was not a Hindu. Surprised ? 

Technically speaking, he belonged to a religion called Fralung. This religion traces its origins to a God named Lengdon. Lengdon’s two children Khunlai and Khunlung came down to earth and started the Tai Ahom dynasty etc etc. Mythology basically, lets say Fralung mythology. Then all this manifests itself as deities like Ngi Ngau Kham etc. There was even a temple to this God at Charaideo in Assam.

But, there are some aspects of this ‘religion’ which are very close to classical Hinduism. Like for example – ancestor worship. Also there was a definite element of idol worship. Infact, an image of Lengdon was given to the king to signify his royal bearing. Then there was the Lakli calender, which closely resembled the Brihaspati Chakra. Also, there is a claim that Lengdon is Indra – but this is contested and since this is not a lecture on theology, I will not go into it. But why is he associated with Indra of all Gods ? A question to ponder.

Most importantly, adopting certain Hindu customs did not make them apostates. Even today, there are members of the Tai Ahom tribe, who while following many ‘Hindu’ customs, still follow Fralung customs like burial.

Even more important, is that after migrating from Burma, this dynasty adopted and enriched the local culture. They welcomed someone  Shankaradeva, built temples, tanks etc and ensured the well being of the people. So maybe initially they were not Hindu, but certainly did more for Hinduism in the north east than some “Hindus” elsewhere in the country. Also, they adopted more and more customs of classical Hinduism as time passed, till we had kings like Rudra Singha who was as Hindu as you or me.

Another interesting question for the secular donkeys to answer — why did this dynasty, at the peak of their power, exposed to so many different ideologies, adopt more customs of Hinduism ? Why not Islam – politically dominant every where else in India ?

For want of a better word – “Indic religion” is a good term to use for Lachit Barphukan specifically. The umbrella under which you will find Buddhism, Jainism perhaps even Sikhism among others. They are intrinsically different from Abrahamic religions and share many things in common. Moreover, in nations like China and Japan, people have been known top officially follow two religions at same time. Within India , is it odd to find Buddha statues in Hindu homes or Jains paying respects at Hindu temples ?

Secular donkeys can think of a religion only in terms of my way or the high way — which is the crux of the problem.

2. He fought against the Hindu Ram Singh. 

Well, this I have mentioned firmly in my book. What’s more, he even prayed at the Hayagriv temple at Hajo. His father also prayed at some temple in the Deccan – when he invaded on behalf of Aurangzeb. But again the secular donkeys forget that while the sword was in Hindu hands, the thought was Mughal. And what did Aurangzeb do in all those territories captured for him by his Hindu mansabdars ? Jaziya is just one example. So, the correct assessment is, he fought against the Mughal empire of Aurangzeb. Again, a common trick of deception perfected by commies – missing the woods for the trees. The whole exercise is of course to absolve the Mughal empire of any wrong.

3. His most important commander was Ismail Siddiqui 

Well, I agree he was an important commander and was instrumental in capturing Guwahati in November 1667. For this he should be known to all and my deepest respects to him. But, he was not the only commander under Lachit Barphukan. As often happens in such cases, his importance has been over blown by many secular donkeys. My question is, why does the Muslim fighting for the Hindu (or the Fralung here) always get mentioned like it is something extra special ? Were not the other people who accompanied Siddiqui important ? How many have heard about Miri Sandikoi, who prevented his entire battalion from retreating at Saraighat ? Doesn’t this itself show that such had been the exception and not the norm ?

Coming to his rank , it was Hazarika. Meaning he led contingents of 1000 soldiers. There were ranks for three thousand and six thousand also. So frankly, there were higher ranked officers who also played a very important role in the Assamese victory.

Well, in this we can see another commie gem — He was patriotic and remained true to his king inspite of being Muslim.

And if you have not seen the problem in that statement, well god help you.

4. It was not a Hindu Muslim struggle. 

Well it was not. It was a struggle between people who wanted swarajya and Uzbek invaders. It had as much logic in it as the Indian Freedom Struggle. Maharashtra, Assam, perhaps Bundelkhand have the distinction in having participated and won in not one but two freedom struggles.

Now, will our secular donkeys agree to this point ?

5. Assam was never a part of India. 

This again comes straight from Marx Tuition Classes. Commies have been trying to fit the Indian “nation” into European definitions and failed. In fact, a nation created on those very communal lines is on verge of falling apart.Pakistan that is. The commie assertion is — no “Indian” power has ruled, and hence it is never part of India. Basically till the British came, Delhi never ruled. Then this leads to usual commie dialogues

India has always been defined in cultural terms. And Assam very well fits in. Narakasur has been mentioned in the Mahabharat, as has been Bhagadatta. Then we have Ulupi and Chitrangada further east. Most important is the Kamakhya mandir at Guwahati. It is a very important Shakti peeth – symbolizing the Yoni. The other important Shakti peeth is in Balochistan ! And likewise there are over fifty spread all over the subcontinent.

This itself should tell us that Assam is culturally integral to India, much like the 12 jyotirlings. Also, the name of Burma was Brahmadesh, and Brahma idols are prevalent in that religion. Kamrup comes from Kamdev. The Yogini Tantra was also composed in Assam. And last but not the least the old name of Guwahati – “Pragjyotishpur” should finish all doubts about its cultural unity with India since ancient times.

well so .. there you go.

 

 

 

Reader reviews – Brahmaputra .

Few reviews of ” Brahmaputra – The Story of Lachit Barphukan, Assamese contemporary of Chhatrapati Shivaji.” written by readers  

Book available for Purchase from Amazon India 

1) By Melroy Pinto , Goa 

Dear Aneesh,

First of all let me congratulate you on doing something many have dreamed of (including me) but have never succeeded – Publishing a book.

Let’s start by judging the book by its cover. The name ‘Brahmaputra’ conjures a picture of the exotic and the unknown, and is an excellent choice. A lot has been written about the Ganges, but the Brahmaputra remains a mystery. The colours used are well balanced and the picture of the sea battle piques the curiosity of the reader. I would also like to mention here that the choice of font used for the name is perfect. I’m glad you didn’t use the commonplace Hinglish Font (English letters written in the devnagiri style). I wonder if there was a reason for off-centering the author’s name. All in all I would give the cover a 10/10.

History was a boring subject for me in school, however the Brahmaputra has been written like a bestseller and hence I couldn’t put it down till I had finished it. I had not heard of Lachit Barphukan before and hence the stories were new to me. The style of writing is easy reading, with a good flow of thought, and a good command of the language. A word of caution, avoid repetitive clichés for eg. Cut, maimed, stabbed, which I recollect was used at least 4 times in the narrative.

The Glossary at the end was a big help, however some more words need to be included e.g. Phukan, Chor bacchas, Swargdeo etc.

What I would liked to have seen included was a map of the area, so I could understand the terrain, how the Brahmaputra flowed and where the battles took place.

Lachit Barphukan comes across as a great military leader who with his small army defeated the mighty armies of the Mughuls and the the Rajputs. This could have only been achieved by using a lot of military strategy. Unfortunately you have not delved much into the strategy involved.

The hero is referred to as Borphukan in all references on the internet. What is the reason you refer to him as Barphukan?

I liked the way you have laced the book with stories of Shivaji, without losing track of the plot.

I hope you look at my critical appreciation in a positive way. The book is an excellent job especially considering it is your first work. Assam is very lucky to have someone from right across the country come and give them a book on their legend. I hope your next work will be about someone from Goa.

All the best.

 

B.Rgds

Melroy

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2.  Godwin Joseph – Kerala , India 

Just completed reading BRAHMAPUTRA. I thought it would be good to give a review here.
I dont think myself to be a person fit for commenting upon the way of writing of Mr. Aneesh Gokhale. But as a proud Indian, I would certainly comment upon the nationalistic spirit infused through this book.
For years, we Indians were taught by our pseudo-secular historians as a race which was subjugated by the foreigners. But no one told us the real history where our brave leaders like Chatrapati Shivaji Maharaj, Rana Pratap or Krishnadevraya who defeated the invaders and regained the honour of our motherland. The Turks, Afghans and the Mughals (the Uzbek barbarians) are praised by these “secularists”.Thankfully, this book is so good as it is written from the standpoint of a nationalist Indian.
Lachit Barphukan. I was so ashamed that I was not aware of this glorious epoch in our history. Assam was always ignored by our historians. But this book provides a vivid picture of 17th century India. The writer has also done really well to show the exploits of Shivaji in his book – the daring raid on Shaista Khan in Pune. It was also so good to read on the politics in the Mughal court.
I would give 4.9/5 for this book. One more request to Aneesh. I am dying to read your first book – Sahyadris to Hindukush. Wonderful work.
Best wishes
From Kerala..

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3.

shobhit review

 

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4. Anurag Nath – Tezpur , Assam 

When one reads this exhilariting and detailed piece of history, very skillfully wriiten and beautifully presented in this book, he or she goes into the beautiful diverse land of the assamese ruled by its ahom dynasty; very sparcely known outside NE. Every patriotic indian should read this book. Special thanks to Aneesh Gokhale.

Sample pages – Jayadhwaj Singha

Sample pages from my book ” Brahmaputra” 

Jayadhwaj Singha

Jayadhwaj Singha , king of the Ahoms , was wearing the ochre coloured robes of a simple soldier. His sword , a weapon with a long  hilt and a straight blade called a  heng dang which denoted his royal stature was missing , and his arms had been covered with cuts and bruises. Tears trickled down his face , mingling with the constant drizzle . He was glad that no one could see his tear stained face , but there was no escaping the lump in his throat which felt heavy and gnawed at his very soul.

He turned his gaze to his left , to a little mound jutting out of the third . It was a burial vault of one of his ancestors . The burial vault was an echo of his ancient Tai Ahom tribal religion of Fralung – much of which had been given up by the Ahoms. But the age old Fralung practise of burying the dead along with the deceased person’s possessions and treasures had stood the test of time and a fast changing civilisation.

Jayadhwaj Singha’s heart ached as he saw the Mughal soldiers attack the burial vault with pick axes , hammers , shovels and swords. Fury raged in his eyes. But there was little he could do about it. Far above him , the dark dank clouds converged into an ugly black mass , adding to the gloominess already enveloping the Ahom king. He looked away as the Mughal soldiers began looting the sacred burial vaults of his forefathers.

His gaze turned to the east , where two huge black  stallions towered above the landscape , reaching into the grey skies . Grotesque in shape and gigantic in size with  eyes that  seemed empty and lifeless. Astride one was a colossal figure  with a white beard and high cheekbones . He was wearing the rich robes of a Mughal noble and a richly adorned pagdi .  He watched the Mughal soldiers go about defiling the burial vault . On the stallion beside him , was a wicked looking man sitting in the saddle. He too wore the exquisite robes of a Mughal noble . Fair of skin and with cold and cruel eyes , his samsher  hung from his cummerbund , still stained with blood. His Afghan turban rested easily on his head , with an end dangling carelessly over his shoulder. Jayadhwaj Singha recognised the two as Mir Jumla and Diler Khan – Mughal sardars who had tormented the Ahoms.

Suddenly he heard a little girl crying . He turned around , only to see his own daughter of six years , standing there , clutching her rag doll. What was she doing there ? In the midst of the Mughal soldiers and those two Mughal sardars he wondered ? He felt someone was looking at him , and turned around to find Mir Jumla glaring at him , with cold , unfeeling eyes .
“ The Ahom king must no longer even look at his own daughter . She belongs to the Mughal harem now “ the figure on the ugly black stallion bellowed . The cruel conditions of the treaty he had signed at Gilijharighat came back flooding to Jayadhwaj Singha ….
“Aaah…” Jayadhwaj Singha awoke with a start. He could feel his heart pounding. Sweat trickled down his forehead. Outside , the cold , dark night stretched into the distance. The unnerving silence pervading everything being broken only by the rhythmic chirping of crickets. Jayadhwaj Singha’s breathing was heavy. All the horrors of the past few months had been brought alive in one cruel nightmare. Tears welled up in his eyes as he remembered his daughter , a mere child of six years , now in the Mughal harem. He mutterd to himself , asking for her forgiveness. The frightening images of the Mughal soldiers danced before his eyes .

And what good was he ? He had heard whispers that the people were calling him “bhagodiya raja “ for having abandoned his capital of Gargaon and sought shelter in the hills of Namrup to the east. But how was he to explain that the arduous journey to the small village of Bakata was also for his people alone – to regroup his armies and inspire them to fight the Mughals once again.

The Ahom king coughed loudly and felt a liquid thud into his hands. The commotion woke up his wife , who rushed towards her husband. Jayadhwaj Singha coughed again and blood splattered onto his simple white clothes. His wife frantically called for the vaidyas and deodhais . Attendants rushed about in panic .

Jayadhwaj Singha knew his end was near . He felt drained and spent , both physically and emotionally. With a voice barely audible and symptomatic of the great pain he was in , he whispered to his wife

“Send for my cousin , Supungmung” he said the words in great pain .

“Quickly, rush to his camp across the stream and bring him here. Tell him to reach here as soon as possible” his wife shouted, his voice having more than a hint of panic.

“He will rule after me … Supungmung… tell him so….”  Jayadhwaj Singha’s breathing was heavy as he spoke. His queen was crying, her tears streaming down her face and staining them. She held Jayadhwaj Singha’s hand, hoping for a miracle. The vaidyas and deodhais frantically brought herbs and potions for the king, but with every passing minute, Jayadhwaj Singha’s condition only worsened. He coughed once again, staining the white clothes of the deodhai a deep red. Then suddenly the hand went limp, and Jayadhwaj Singha’s heart stopped beating  forever….

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